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JC
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Re: Novelty Merchantman Crane

Postby JC » Sat Aug 10, 2019 11:32 pm

gameswat wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:09 pm
While I've seen many variations from the adverts with the much smaller production British made machines...
So were they made in this country under licence? That would certainly come as a monumental revelation!
WP_20190809_15_54_08_Pro.jpg
My machine at Brighton

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gameswat
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Re: Novelty Merchantman Crane

Postby gameswat » Sun Aug 11, 2019 9:08 am

No you misread that sentence JC. I was saying all kinds of British made machines were made in such small amounts that they often vary in the small details dramatically from any advertising, so there are many variants of marquees to BMCO allwins for example. While US produced machines were usually much more professional and exact with far fewer odd variations.

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JC
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Re: Novelty Merchantman Crane

Postby JC » Wed Aug 14, 2019 12:01 am

Ah, I see - totally misunderstood. But yes, I agree with what you say about British machines. Many were made in such relatively small numbers, often using materials that were available at the time, that they were practically individually hand-built.

But back to Merchantman cranes. There does appear to be an inconsistency with, what we tend to call here in the UK, the 'small' Merchantman cranes. The casting on the front of my crane (pictured above) seems to be standard here and is the only style I've encountered over many years on other machines. However, the casting on your machine Gameswat, is completely different, although is as illustrated in the ESCo flyer. Any ideas on what the story is there?

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pennymachines
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Re: Novelty Merchantman Crane

Postby pennymachines » Wed Aug 14, 2019 9:01 am

From page 258 of Arcade 1 (Bueschel & Gronowski):
As successful as it was, the NOVELTY MERCHANTMAN was soon up for yet another improvement, the latter the idea of Claude R. Kirk, of California... Kirk quickly picked up on prior work by other Exhibit Supply engineers and designers to create a large hopper type dispenser to avoid the problems of premium clogging (Patent No. 1,998,625, "Delivery Service," Patentee Claude R. Kirk, Chicago, Ill., assignor to John F. Meyer, Flintbridge, Calif.). They stuck it on the front of the machine to create the "Roll Chute" 1935 Novelty Merchantman, as shown.
NMC.jpg
1998625.jpg

woodrails
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Re: Novelty Merchantman Crane

Postby woodrails » Sat Jul 25, 2020 12:31 am

I have just joined this group. I am restoring a Novelty Merchantman (including a new cabinet) and have a question about mounting a graphic on the back. The metal plate there is rusted badly and I will be sanding it down to bare metal. What is the best way to apply my print onto the metal? I'm thinking I ought to primer and paint the metal before applying the print. But once that is done should I just use spray adhesive? I could use some advice.

I also hope to locate a replacement for my front faceplate and the metal molding that's located just below it. I also hope to find a light dome for the top. Thanks.

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gameswat
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Re: Novelty Merchantman Crane

Postby gameswat » Sat Jul 25, 2020 8:59 am

Hey Woody, all the Novelty cranes I've seen have had a print attached to thin cardboard, held in place with small quarter molding nailed on all edges, same molding that holds the glasses in place. Much easier to deal with if you replace it sometime.

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watlingman
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Re: Novelty Merchantman Crane

Postby watlingman » Sun Jul 26, 2020 5:38 pm

HI I have just restored a similar crane I had the artwork printed onto hard wearing card cut to correct size saves lots of time and hassle, just depends on what you want to spend mine cost £140 but was well pleased with results, good luck
ETC 32-33 for email.jpg

woodrails
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Re: Novelty Merchantman Crane

Postby woodrails » Sun Jul 26, 2020 10:38 pm

I'm wondering what the purpose is for the metal plate. Wood will expand/contract with humidity changes so applying it directly to wood is not a good idea. Applying to a thick card stock makes sense but is it going to be rigid over time or will it bow, warp, etc.? I'm leaning toward sandwiching it between the metal plate or even just the plywood back wall and a thin sheet of plexiglass. Any thoughts on that?

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badpenny
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Re: Novelty Merchantman Crane

Postby badpenny » Mon Jul 27, 2020 12:21 pm

I think for a protracted lifespan your suggestion is good.
I would guess they weren't that strong when new is more down to the lack of expectation that these machine would still be working (even if only with collectors) 80 or 90 years later.
Also there might have been a nice little earner going on in replacing them to modernise the game a bit.

I guess the deciding factor lies with the owner being: -

* a stickler for accuracy/authenticity
* tolerant of machines in mint condition
* someone who prefers a more used look to showroom gleam.

The same sort of things we witness in the coin operated hobby today regardless of which machine.

BP :cool:

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gameswat
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Re: Novelty Merchantman Crane

Postby gameswat » Mon Jul 27, 2020 1:51 pm

woodrails wrote:
Sun Jul 26, 2020 10:38 pm
I'm wondering what the purpose is for the metal plate. Wood will expand/contract with humidity changes so applying it directly to wood is not a good idea. Applying to a thick card stock makes sense but is it going to be rigid over time or will it bow, warp, etc.? I'm leaning toward sandwiching it between the metal plate or even just the plywood back wall and a thin sheet of plexiglass. Any thoughts on that?
I imagine your metal backing is a later replacement in place of the original poster. When you remove the tin for rust removal you should see signs of earlier attachment if the poster was used as held in place by the quarter round wood moldings, which leaves nail holes along all the edges. I think you are well overthinking this as the main body of the cranes is plywood so almost no shrinkage can occur. And since the hard life of the machine is long gone now it should survive many many decades without an issue.


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