Page 7 of 7

Re: Novelty Merchantman Crane

Posted: Sat Aug 10, 2019 11:32 pm
by JC
gameswat wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:09 pm
While I've seen many variations from the adverts with the much smaller production British made machines...
So were they made in this country under licence? That would certainly come as a monumental revelation!

Re: Novelty Merchantman Crane

Posted: Sun Aug 11, 2019 9:08 am
by gameswat
No you misread that sentence JC. I was saying all kinds of British made machines were made in such small amounts that they often vary in the small details dramatically from any advertising, so there are many variants of marquees to BMCO allwins for example. While US produced machines were usually much more professional and exact with far fewer odd variations.

Re: Novelty Merchantman Crane

Posted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 12:01 am
by JC
Ah, I see - totally misunderstood. But yes, I agree with what you say about British machines. Many were made in such relatively small numbers, often using materials that were available at the time, that they were practically individually hand-built.

But back to Merchantman cranes. There does appear to be an inconsistency with, what we tend to call here in the UK, the 'small' Merchantman cranes. The casting on the front of my crane (pictured above) seems to be standard here and is the only style I've encountered over many years on other machines. However, the casting on your machine Gameswat, is completely different, although is as illustrated in the ESCo flyer. Any ideas on what the story is there?

Re: Novelty Merchantman Crane

Posted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 9:01 am
by pennymachines
From page 258 of Arcade 1 (Bueschel & Gronowski):
As successful as it was, the NOVELTY MERCHANTMAN was soon up for yet another improvement, the latter the idea of Claude R. Kirk, of California... Kirk quickly picked up on prior work by other Exhibit Supply engineers and designers to create a large hopper type dispenser to avoid the problems of premium clogging (Patent No. 1,998,625, "Delivery Service," Patentee Claude R. Kirk, Chicago, Ill., assignor to John F. Meyer, Flintbridge, Calif.). They stuck it on the front of the machine to create the "Roll Chute" 1935 Novelty Merchantman, as shown.