R&W Allwin Restoration

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JC
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R&W Allwin Restoration

Post by JC »

Mark Monroe wrote a very interesting article for issue 71, giving an account of the restoration of his Ruffler & Walker Fill ‘em Up allwin. Having stripped off the nasty yellow paint job and continued with stripping and cleaning the mechanism, polishing the case etc., Mark was left with one last job, to find a missing part – the payout knob. The knobs on these R&W machines are large cast aluminium jobbies, more like door knobs. They have to be large as there is a lot of mechanism to shift when the knob is turned. As an original knob was not available, Mark decided to cast his own – something most of us would not even have contemplated. As he didn’t have the facilities to cast in aluminium, Mark used a white metal known as ‘Prince August’, which is more commonly used for producing toy soldiers. As it has a relatively low melting point, it is an ideal material for the home hobbyist.

Mark emailed me a large number of pictures to accompany the article, most of which I was unable to use – partly due to space, but also due to the fact they are quite dark and would have looked pretty awful in b&w. So here they are:
Attachments
Mark's allwin, before restoration<br />(and with a missing knob)!
Mark's allwin, before restoration
(and with a missing knob)!
The knob on another R&amp;W machine.
The knob on another R&W machine.
R&W 2.jpg (47.84 KiB) Viewed 3485 times
Some of Mark's sketches before producing the mould.
Some of Mark's sketches before producing the mould.
Half of the mould.
Half of the mould.
The other half of the mould, showing the markings for the flutes, which have been hand filed.
The other half of the mould, showing the markings for the flutes, which have been hand filed.
The 'bung' which will be assembled with the mould, and will form the hollow in the knob when the molten metal is poured.
The 'bung' which will be assembled with the mould, and will form the hollow in the knob when the molten metal is poured.
Both halves of the mould and some sticks of Prince August metal.
Both halves of the mould and some sticks of Prince August metal.
The Prince August metal, broken up and ready for melting.
The Prince August metal, broken up and ready for melting.
The assembled mould, having had molten white metal poured into it.<br />Almost there!
The assembled mould, having had molten white metal poured into it.
Almost there!
Breaking open the mould.
Breaking open the mould.
Cleaning up the casting.
Cleaning up the casting.
Drilling the hole for the spindle.
Drilling the hole for the spindle.
The completed knob, with spindle fitted.
The completed knob, with spindle fitted.
Mark's finished machine, complete with nice new shiny knob.
Mark's finished machine, complete with nice new shiny knob.
andydotp
Posts: 535
Joined: Sat Feb 25, 2012 4:35 pm

Re: R&W Allwin Restoration

Post by andydotp »

What a terrific post - thanks JC and well done Mark on a superb restoration job.
andydotp
13rebel
Posts: 524
Joined: Tue Nov 03, 2009 4:03 pm

Re: R&W Allwin Restoration

Post by 13rebel »

Hear hear! **xXx**
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