General vintage slot machine related topics.
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hiflyer
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Re: 3D printing

Postby hiflyer » Tue Apr 15, 2014 8:00 pm

First thing to create with a 3D printer is..............another 3D printer!

johnstevenjacob
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Re: 3D printing

Postby johnstevenjacob » Wed Apr 23, 2014 7:36 am

It’s cool you found a cheap 3D printer. That’s a great start for creating anything you want. Anyway, does it support various types of plastic filament? It would be great if it can feed not just standard filament, but also the premium ones like nylon and rubber filament. See more of the premium plastic here: http://www.3d2print.net/shop/product-ca ... -filament/

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yaksplat
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Re: 3D printing

Postby yaksplat » Wed Apr 23, 2014 3:19 pm

I know that's one of the updates that they're going to be providing hopefully sooner than later. I know that they're trying out different filaments other than the standard ABS and PLA.

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slotalot
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Re: 3D printing

Postby slotalot » Wed Apr 23, 2014 3:39 pm

It is not just the filaments that you have to consider :tut These 3D printers are a little like paper printers, to get a good finish to your product you will need a 3D machine with good resolution printing capabilities, and as usual the better the machine the more it is going to cost you, :!?!: but as with everything else over time the prices should start to drop... !!RAYOF!!

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yaksplat
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Re: 3D printing

Postby yaksplat » Wed Apr 23, 2014 5:40 pm

The one that I have listed above has a layer resolution up to 50 micron. That will leave some very slight ridges, but nothing that some minor sanding can't take out. From there the piece could either be used to make a mold or chromed and used as is.

I figure for $200, it's well worth the shot.

Any part designs that I draw, I will make available to the community here.

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slotalot
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Re: 3D printing

Postby slotalot » Tue Apr 29, 2014 8:36 pm

On the subject of 3D printing, take a look at this.... http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2014/04/l ... n-the-air/ :o

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badpenny
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Re: 3D printing

Postby badpenny » Tue Apr 29, 2014 9:44 pm

Right! ... I am now officially scared. :o

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pennymachines
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Re: 3D printing

Postby pennymachines » Tue Apr 29, 2014 10:07 pm

Maplin also recently started selling a similar device (3Doodler). I think it's a glorified hot glue gun - fun for craft projects but not much use to us. I'm holding out for an affordable metal laser sintering 3D printer.

In my view, considerations of cost, limited resolution and maximum print size disqualify the current crop of home printers. A commercial print service might be feasible, but you still have the task of creating suitable 3D modelling or scans. For most purposes I think old fashioned hand-crafted patterns are still the easiest way to make custom parts.

BEYOND THE HYPE AND HOPE OF 3D PRINTING: WHAT CONSUMERS SHOULD EXPECT

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pennymachines
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Re: 3D printing

Postby pennymachines » Fri Nov 07, 2014 2:15 pm

pennymachines wrote:I'm holding out for an affordable metal laser sintering 3D printer.
It looks like this may not be so far away. At least a working prototype of a consumer level (sub £3000-ish) metal printer has been built and tested using bronze (other metals should also work).
printer.jpg
It uses a novel technique called Selective Inhibition Sintering. Basically, to keep the price down, a standard inkjet printhead deposits a chemical sintering inhibitor together with the metal powder so that "once all of the layers have been completed, the entire part is removed from the machine and bulk sintered in a conventional sintering furnace".
Torabi Payman, Petros Matthew, and Khoshnevis Behrokh. 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing. September 2014.
figure5.jpg
CAD model of a Möbius strip (left) and the resulting printed part.
figure4.jpg
CAD model of a crescent wrench (left) and the resulting printed part.

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operator bell
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Re: 3D printing

Postby operator bell » Fri Nov 07, 2014 10:09 pm

I've had some experience with inexpensive 3D printers and it wasn't encouraging. They do well on very small flat parts, but if there's any significant depth you get slump and occasionally a step. I look at the things other people claim to have made with incredulity. Expensive 3D printers, on the other hand, can do fantastic jobs. Like this rook, for example. 2 inches high, it has a spiral staircase running up the inside wall and a double helix between the roof and floor. It was a sample showing capability but I think the machine cost well into six figures a few years ago.
rook_sla.JPG
About the best you can do with a cheap printer is use it to make a model, then sand and fill the model until it's decent and use it to make a mold for a casting.


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