General vintage slot machine related topics.
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arrgee
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Slot machine / bandit anagrams, etymology etc.

Postby arrgee » Thu Jan 15, 2015 10:00 am

Slot machines have always had the capability to rearrange lives, so to have words.................

the eyes: rearranged = they see

slot machines: rearranged = cash lost in me

desperation: rearranged = a rope ends it

Happy New Year everyone !!COOEE!!

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badpenny
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Re: Slot Machines and Words

Postby badpenny » Thu Jan 15, 2015 12:26 pm

Thanks Arrgee ..... cheered me up no end. '!'

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treefrog
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Bandit?

Postby treefrog » Mon Jan 19, 2015 6:41 pm

Topic merged - Site Admin.

One arm bandit - what is the history of this term and where does it come from......one obviously assumes it relates the single arm and the ability to fleece you of every penny....is it British, American, Mexican? Who used is first and why is it. More commonly used in the UK.....you can tell I am bored...

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badpenny
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Re: Bandit?

Postby badpenny » Mon Jan 19, 2015 8:55 pm

I always thought it was a British thing, then I saw the Frank Polk Figures from Americaland, then there's the spelling.
Is it one arm bandit or one armed bandit?

When I worked in Spain back in the 70s, although they were illegal (pre Franco) their nickname was "Tragapelas" which literally meant "Dosh Swallower"
Perhaps Mr Peterson of this parish could give us the viewpoint from his end of the village?

BP

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john t peterson
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Re: Bandit?

Postby john t peterson » Mon Jan 19, 2015 11:10 pm

BP,

Sorry…I'm an allwin type of guy.

Most of my fellow American collectors are most interested in coin-op that either originated in the US or was manufactured here in large quantities. One of them would be better suited to weigh in on the etymology of the "bandit" term. I always thought it was a British reference to slot machines and not commonly used here in the States, but I could be wrong.

By the way, one of my mother's distant cousins was a bank robber in Wyoming at the turn of the century, (19th.) They hit the local bank and his fellow bandits took the paper; he took the coin and was caught outside town, trapped by the barb wire fence he tried unsuccessfully to climb over. Not too smart.

J Peterson
American bandit by blood !!BANGBANG!!

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coppinpr
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Re: Bandit?

Postby coppinpr » Tue Jan 20, 2015 7:35 pm

badpenny wrote:When I worked in Spain back in the 70s, although they were illegal (pre Franco)
I know you're old BP but pre Franco! You would have had to be working there in 1936!!

The term "one arm bandit" (not one armed bandit) appears to be American - its first recorded use was in 1934 and was this comment from a report at the time,I think from periodical
A slot machine, as in It's amazing how many people think they can make money playing a one-armed bandit. This term refers to both appearance and function: the operating lever looks like an arm, and the machine in effect robs players, since it “wins” and keeps the player's money in an overwhelming majority of instances.
[c. 1934 ]

It is also a noun and not a verb, so it's the name of something, not its function.

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badpenny
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Re: Bandit?

Postby badpenny » Tue Jan 20, 2015 8:20 pm

I realised after I'd pressed the button that I should have said "pre death of Franco" .... luckily I have an alibi.

Perhaps we have another American member as John P, suggests who can confirm Paul's findings? Or at the very least show us on Google Street where John P's distant relative got hung up on barbed wire.

Now then "Barbed Wire" what was that originally called? :!?!:

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treefrog
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Re: Bandit?

Postby treefrog » Tue Jan 20, 2015 10:26 pm

Wikipedia didn't help, except I did not realise in Scotland bandits are called "puggy". Where did that come from?

jonesthegarage
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Re: Bandit?

Postby jonesthegarage » Wed Jan 21, 2015 7:32 am

"Puggy" is an old Scottish word for "Monkey" and the word was used for the street organs often accompanied by these.

Not only did it mutate into use for any kind of slot/fruit machine but is now in use as a term for the ATM (which at least have a higher payout rate).

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coppinpr
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Re: Bandit?

Postby coppinpr » Wed Jan 21, 2015 7:39 am

Jonesthegarage wrote:...the ATM (which at least have a higher payout rate)

Not sure you're right there - what with bank charges and the like, my business account always has less in it than I put in.


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