Somebody knows... Maybe you?
User avatar
treefrog
Posts: 3354
Joined: Mon Sep 29, 2008 2:46 pm
Location: Suffolk

Veneering

Postby treefrog » Tue Jun 15, 2010 12:40 pm

Stoxman22 has posted a potential supplier of veneers onto the resource section (Real Wood Veneer Supplies), which has reminded me to ask what people's experience of taking on a veneering has been. Being a total novice, I was considering completing refurbs on a bunch of Beromats I have, where the ravages of time have left the cases rather worn and tattered looking. I know Harold (EnglishmanII) has done a great job on his machines, but anyone had any experience of iron on veneer. Also I note that they seem to have a thicker base backing, but have not seen these for sale, similar to the rougher material on the back of Beromats.

TIA

stoxman22
Posts: 61
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2005 10:18 am
Location: Cheshire

Re: Veneering

Postby stoxman22 » Tue Jun 15, 2010 9:26 pm

By coincidence I found the veneer company because I am re covering a Beromat. The bloke at the company made it sound simple to re-veneer. I have since found out I missed some vital info. The veneers they make are not iron on they are thin slices of plain wood. I have found that it is very hard to cut them with the grain, you get a very poor edge which is not good if you are trying to join two pieces to cover the front. The technique is to either put the two pieces of veneer on top of each other and trap them between two large straight edged pieces of wood with them slightly proud and then sand the edges flat to the wood they are trapped in. Or place one on top of the other and cut the edge off with a veneer knife against a straight edge.
I have fixed mine with PVA which is what the guy recommended but I have heard that most people use an impact adhesive like Evostick.
Finally I have managed to do the front panel without flattening the veneer first as I only found that is is best to flatten it when I looked up how to apply veneer on the net. When I put the veneer on it absorbed the PVA and curled up like a medieval scroll.

Having said all that the front is looking quite nice now and a test of different varnishes is looking good for the satin finish.

raj
Posts: 605
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2008 7:19 am

Re: Veneering

Postby raj » Wed Jun 16, 2010 9:52 pm

You need to apply a glue base first (available from your veneer supplier) with a hot iron, then, once the glue is totally secure, iron on the veneer. Cutting with the grain is difficult & best done with a guillatine ( sorry about the spelling). Heavy even pressure is needed to make the veneer stick & even on flat surfaces this can result in air bubbles. These can be sliced and glued with PVA. Curved sides are even more difficult.
Be prepared to start over if it goes.

User avatar
badpenny
Forum Moderator
Posts: 6011
Joined: Thu May 05, 2005 12:41 pm
Location: East Midlands
Contact:

Re: Veneering

Postby badpenny » Thu Jun 17, 2010 8:07 am

This all seems ripe to me for a bout of practicing a few new adjectives whilst learning how aerodynamic your tools are.......... !MOODY!

stoxman22
Posts: 61
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2005 10:18 am
Location: Cheshire

Re: Veneering

Postby stoxman22 » Thu Jun 17, 2010 2:16 pm

Update; My first attempt at veneering looked ok the day I did it. Two days later it looks like a dog’s dinner. Splits all along the edges. Gaps where the two sheets meet. Glue all over the place. Looks like it is all coming off for a second try.

User avatar
slotalot
Posts: 1816
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 1:53 pm
Location: Halifax West Yorkshire
Contact:

Re: Veneering

Postby slotalot » Thu Jun 17, 2010 7:32 pm

Stoxman22 wrote: Gaps where the two sheets meet.
Hi Stoxman22 :D
Just a thought !PUZZLED! ...are you firmly taping the two sheets together on the finished side"before" you glue them to the base board? This will help to stop the cracks opening up on the finished work; also if you place a sheet of newspaper over the veneer with a flat board on top with lots of weights pressing it down until the glue dries you may get better results !THUMBS! Any excess glue, tape and newspaper can be sanded off later when it's dry, :tarah:

User avatar
badpenny
Forum Moderator
Posts: 6011
Joined: Thu May 05, 2005 12:41 pm
Location: East Midlands
Contact:

Re: Veneering

Postby badpenny » Fri Jun 18, 2010 9:58 am

There speaks the voice of a patient artisan ............... if this were me I think at this stage I'd be reaching for the 6" nails and my very special thumpometer !GRUMBLES!

User avatar
operator bell
Posts: 562
Joined: Thu Dec 06, 2007 7:30 am
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Contact:

Re: Veneering

Postby operator bell » Sat Jun 19, 2010 1:46 am

I veneered a Novomat a couple of years ago. It was my first veneering job and I don't mind telling you, I spoke a few choice words during the process. It's a good thing the veneer store had a minimum order and I had to buy five times as much as I needed. My veneer was too narrow to cover the front in one sheet, so I had to join two sheets down the middle.

After carefully trimming and aligning two strips for the front, I brushed them with PVA glue. They promptly rolled up into tight little tubes an inch in diameter. I carefully cut another two pieces and thought I could trick it by pasting the case instead of the veneer. It went on nice and flat, then wrinkled up in a washboard profile. Oh, it will flatten out when it dries, I though. But it didn't.

After chiseling and sanding the veneer and dried glue off, I went the contact adhesive route. Large can of glue and paintbrush in hand, I liberally coated the machine and the veneer. No wrinkling, no rolling, good. I let it dry and carefully laid it in place, then went to bed. When it dried, it shrank. Let me tell you, it's a lot more difficult to remove contact adhesive than PVA.

Finally I did it with contact adhesive again, except this time I laid down and carefully matched up the edges of the strips down the center of the machine, preventing it touching anywhere else by laying down a quantity of pencils as spacers. I let it set up for an hour or two, then rubbed the rest of it down working out from the center, leaving an overhang to trim off later. There were no air bubbles but there was a piece of grit blown in. Luckily it ended up underneath one of the metal trims and can't be seen.

By comparison, the rest of it was easy.

User avatar
slotalot
Posts: 1816
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 1:53 pm
Location: Halifax West Yorkshire
Contact:

Re: Veneering

Postby slotalot » Sat Jun 19, 2010 8:35 am

Badpenny wrote: There speaks the voice of a patient artisan
Artisan? Me? !PUZZLED! No I just like to have a go :oops: and I have made my fair share of ***** ups with veneer, but you are right when you say I am patient !SAINT! I think you have to be as it's not an easy thing to do :dammit:
I have just found this on the internet that may shed some light on how to get a good finish, I may try this next time I do any :tarah:

[youtube]3rrMtYHTAIs[/youtube]

User avatar
pennymachines
Site Admin
Posts: 4745
Joined: Wed Nov 06, 2002 12:12 am
Location: The Black Country
Contact:

Re: Veneering

Postby pennymachines » Sat Jun 19, 2010 11:51 am

I've used the traditional animal glue for veneering (casting aside my vegetarian scruples). It's liquid when hot (melted in a glue pot), so if things don't go smoothly, all is not lost. Adjustments can be made with the aid of a steam iron.


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests