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Wulff Arizona restoration

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2019 1:56 pm
by jothebulb
From reading around on the forums here & some searching online, I believe I have an English-market model of a Wulff wall-mounted machine. The case is pretty battered, but crucially (for me) the mechanism just about works: it was sold to me as not working, but I discovered the last owner had tried using it with modern 2p pieces & I believe it should correctly be used with old pre-decimal pennies. Once I had cleared the jam, the system runs.

I’d love to be directed to any resources or knowledgeable people to help me restore this machine (for example, bent nails have been used to replace some of the pins inside the mechanism) both mechanically & cosmetically - as you can see from this image, the poor thing hasn’t been well looked after, but is still solid.

Jon.

Re: Wulff Arizona restoration

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:04 pm
by badpenny
Nice machine I've had a couple myself.
To help the mech, use a degreaser or acetone to remove any grease it may have been lathered in, and use a light oil on anything that moves except the coin slides.
You will see oiling holes on a lot of the spindles, and the bearings on the back of the clock.
Post some photos of the bits you have doubts about and we can advise better.

BP :cool:

Re: Wulff Arizona restoration

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:17 pm
by jothebulb
Dear BP,

Thanks for the advice - all useful for someone who is really just starting out. I’ve also read the basic tips & tricks section.

Re: Wulff Arizona restoration

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2019 9:10 pm
by coppinpr
Your machine is not that bad. Remove all the ironmongery and work on the case. Let's see a better photo of the glass so we can advise.

Re: Wulff Arizona restoration

Posted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 9:30 am
by arrgee
Often thought about the design of the Wulff pull knobs and wondered if the pointed design was intended to deter punters from slamming down the handle and damaging the alloy mech?

Re: Wulff Arizona restoration

Posted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 1:25 pm
by badpenny
You're right.
I'm not sure it's solely because of the Mazac construction of the mechanism.
Very few punters would ever realise that the force you pull the handle on a bandit has no effect at all on how fast they spin. And even if it did, why they should think it gives them a better chance of winning??
The Germans realised that if the handle has a sharp point it would deter players from slamming the handle.

American bandits also tended to incorporate an anti-slam device but it's situated inside the cabinet on the plate that secures the handle. It works on centrifugal force. If pulled gently everything descends nicely. However if slammed down then the hinged trigger will be thrown up and out to jam against the teeth of the bracket attached to the cabinet.

Freea.jpg
At rest
jammeda.jpg
Handle slammed, mech jammed to protect.
BP :cool:

Re: Wulff Arizona restoration

Posted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 1:41 pm
by coppinpr
I think I'm right in thinking there were no German used "Arizona" machines. That glass being part of the UK refurb. I think they all started life as either Wulff "Prefekta" or Lindl "Ludus" (which is so like the "Prefekta" - it has to have been made under licence from Wulff a few years later than the original). I think some "Prefekta" machines were also re-hashed with an English translation (including the name) of the original glass.

Re: Wulff Arizona restoration

Posted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 6:17 pm
by badpenny
Those two also have two extra windows on the reel line.
Probably a tilt flag and a free spin.
Remnants of those extras should still be evidenced on the Arizona mech.
It would be interesting to see if they there now. Thus confirming Paul's theory.

BP :cool:

Re: Wulff Arizona restoration

Posted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 7:39 pm
by jothebulb
Hi,

Here are some closer images of the front glass.

Re: Wulff Arizona restoration

Posted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 7:54 pm
by jothebulb
And here are some images of the mechanism. I am concerned that there may be some parts missing - especially the starter button, that doesn't appear to connect to anything at all...

I have provided some close-ups of the more suspect parts of the machine - I think the coin tube that stacks the coins above the payout selector seems to have been hand-made from scratch. Also is a close-up of the bent nail that holds together parts of the payout mechanism.

All thoughts & observations gratefully received.