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john t peterson
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Re: Early French Allwin

Postby john t peterson » Wed Apr 08, 2020 12:39 pm

For those of us who actually know something about these machines, the show implicitly raises the issue of restoration. What does "restore" actually mean? In this case, it means an attempt to return the machine to a state that approximates the appearance and condition as new. This definition is seen in certain circles, like cars, as in "I restored my '57 Chevy." I would expect that Chevy to look like it just drove off the showroom. When dealing with antiques, the term takes on a different connotation. Much of the value inherent in antiques lies with the maintenance of the article in its current aged state. If you take an antique clock with plenty of patina and polish it up to look new, you have devalued the clock greatly. I think the same applies to our older coin-operated machines. For my money, a proper restoration of this French Allwins would have been to replace the garish yellow cloth with a nice piece of aged felt, replace the lower hinge with an identical piece and put the machine on the shelf. The man in the video transformed a stately lady into a common everyday pedestrian. I cringed to watch him Brasso up the brass. Although the program gives attention to our hobby, it is a disservice to the preservation of these treasures.

Just my opinion.

J Peterson
Opinionated in America

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brigham
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Re: Early French Allwin

Postby brigham » Thu Apr 09, 2020 7:34 am

treefrog wrote:
Tue Apr 07, 2020 10:37 pm
I see it is finally hitting the television in the new series on restoring old items called “Mend it for money” on Channel 4.
So aimed at traders, rather than the enthusiast, then.
At least they are honest about it.

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treefrog
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Re: Early French Allwin

Postby treefrog » Tue Apr 14, 2020 8:34 am

As with all these restoration programs now popping up, they don’t give much info on the actual work and this program certainly limited this. They restored a Porsche 928 and showed absolutely nothing of the restoration work. On the Allwin a little more was shown, would have like to have seen the coin chute construction as they looked quite good. Of all the programs, I think I prefer Salvage Hunters version as they do give a lot of tips I have used on things like wood repairs etc.

I cannot believe anyone would have bought this machine though for £1371, there are loads of overpriced allwins permanently on eBay which never sell... Am I a little suspicious perhaps this was bumped up? ;-)

sentimental salvage
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Re: Early French Allwin

Postby sentimental salvage » Thu Apr 16, 2020 6:43 am

I have a similar machine with a moveable clown that catches the ball (if you're lucky).

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brigham
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Re: Early French Allwin

Postby brigham » Thu Apr 16, 2020 8:15 am

There's something irritating about those, and I've never pinned down what it is.

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treefrog
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Re: Early French Allwin

Postby treefrog » Thu Nov 12, 2020 11:40 am

I only just noticed, Nick Zammeti who did the French Allwin restoration did another shortly afterwards a Saxony machine. Interesting I did not know they were from 1805. :HaHa:

Anyway, a shortened version and removes previous poor restoration work and, I have to admit, looks again a lot better, in fact very nice. Of course shiny metal is not my thing, but I think again this type of interest has to be good for the hobby. !!THUMBSX2!!



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Re: Early French Allwin

Postby badpenny » Thu Nov 12, 2020 12:49 pm

Perhaps he means he restored it at five past six at night.

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john t peterson
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Re: Early French Allwin

Postby john t peterson » Thu Nov 12, 2020 2:24 pm

Nick did a nice job tarting up a fairly common allwin. I wonder how much time it took?

J Peterson
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arrgee
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Re: Early French Allwin

Postby arrgee » Thu Nov 12, 2020 6:31 pm

OMG ! he even highly polished his pennies - George V would be really pissed off :!: :shock:


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