Building a slot machine from scratch? You're not alone in your madness.
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Scratchbuilt
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Building a Payramid

Postby Scratchbuilt » Fri Apr 04, 2003 2:24 pm

Hi
Wonder if you can help me on this. I am making a scratch built Payramid for my next project. I don't have any details of the internal mechanism apart from photos on the melright web page.
Do you have any documentation at all for this machine available. If you also have other info please let me know what is available and prices.
Regards
Scratchbuilt.

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pennymachines
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Re Building a Payramid

Postby pennymachines » Fri Apr 04, 2003 2:31 pm

Hi
Do you know what you are getting into? There's a fair bit of mech. in a Payramid. I admire your ambition.
Have a look at the Payramid patent 431216 in the Archive. It includes all the technical drawings.
This is for the early version, which differs considerably from the version with the bottom cash draw. Apart from that, there are just the advertising flyers, which show a small view of the mech.
Good luck!
Last edited by pennymachines on Sat Jan 08, 2005 4:39 pm, edited 13 times in total.

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Scratchbuilt
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Location: Liverpool

Re Building a Payramid

Postby Scratchbuilt » Fri Apr 04, 2003 2:37 pm

Many many thanks for the info. I will have to study it now to see how everything works. Take your point about the difficulty but it will just add to the experience!
I will also enjoy exploring the other Bryans patents. I'm utterly fascinated by how Bryan dealt with mechanical problem solving.
Kind regards,
Scratchbuilt.

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pennymachines
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Re: Building a Payramid

Postby pennymachines » Fri Apr 04, 2003 2:40 pm

Unfortunately Mr Bryan did not patent the Retreeva. Paradoxically this is quite a bit simpler mechanically than the Payramid, and looks an easier proposition to copy.
Have you already tried your hand at making a machine from scratch? Do you have an engineering background?
One of the patents for a machine which was either never manufactured, or simply hasn't survived would make an interesting project.

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Scratchbuilt
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Location: Liverpool

Re Building a Payramid

Postby Scratchbuilt » Fri Apr 04, 2003 2:43 pm

I've made a version of the elevenses with variable payout and I'm in the middle of making a Conveyor. I have no engineering background but I'm quite handy and I worked out the mechanics by guesswork. I've also made a ride on train and coach. This is 12v electric and I used the bits from an old battery lawnmower. I have 300 ft of track in the back garden and the kids (me included) use it for hours on one battery charge. As you can see I enjoy a challenge ( the mechanics on the conveyor are quite a challenge, its all fine engineering with wheels, chains and sprockets which is a bit of a problem without a lathe etc). I well remember all the arcade machines when I was younger and as I am now semi retired I decided to see if I could make some. I suppose I could just buy them but the real fun for me is in working out how they are put together and admiring the ingenuity of them. Technical information is a bit hard to come by, I can't find any books in the library so the info you are supplying is fantastic. I've spent several hours going over the drawings and I now know basically how the Payramid works. Next job is to enlarge the drawings 300% and make all the parts but I agree with you that it is very complicated.
I don't aim to make an exact replica, just one that looks pretty similar and actually works.

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pennymachines
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Re Building a Payramid

Postby pennymachines » Fri Apr 04, 2003 2:59 pm

Your electric train sounds clever. Along similar lines I have two coin-operated bumper cars (run off 12v car batteries) which are also very popular with the kids. I didn't make them myself though (Whitaker Brothers). Forgot to mention - I emailed you a jpg of the Payramid flyer. Maybe you found it.

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Scratchbuilt
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Location: Liverpool

Postby Scratchbuilt » Fri Apr 04, 2003 3:02 pm

Sounds like we have a mini fairground between us! Yes thanks I found the flyer which was useful because it mentioned the dimensions. I'm cheching some of the other patents so I can understand the mechanics of coin release, coin return, ball release etc etc.

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Scratchbuilt
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Re Building a Payramid

Postby Scratchbuilt » Fri Apr 04, 2003 3:06 pm

I can report back that the project is now completed, and, amazingly, works very well. Bryan certainly knew his stuff and got his geometry right. My machine makes a very satisfying smooth noise as the crank is turned and everything slides into place as per the patent design. The maze was a bit of a challenge - I ended up making it from epoxy clay (which hardens overnight) and embedded copper tubes. It seems to work ok. My kids love playing this machine. I haven't yet managed to drop a jackpot despite using 12 balls in play instead of 8!!
Anyway, time for the next project. I've got my eye on the multi-column allwins. Mel shows two models on his website "Fill-em-up" and"What's my line?". Would you by any chance have any useful info on either of these? Alternatively do you have anything on the "Ball past the arrow" machines?

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pennymachines
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Re Building a Payramid

Postby pennymachines » Fri Apr 04, 2003 3:11 pm

Well that's quite an achievement - and in such a short time. Maybe it's quicker to build these things from scratch than to restore them! I'm curious to see - have you got a picture?

I've never seen any technical info on either the multiballs or the Arrow. The multiball is a bit of an awkward contraption - particularly in the way it's contrived to pay out different amounts with one turn of the handle.
The Arrow exists in several versions - the mechanism was quite radically redesigned over the years. The final version is best, I think, and would be the easiest to copy (about half the mech. of the earlier ones).

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Scratchbuilt
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Re Building a Payramid

Postby Scratchbuilt » Fri Apr 04, 2003 3:20 pm

Here it is: My version of the Payramid. It cost me about £70 to build altogether, much cheaper than an original.
homemade2.jpg
homemade2.jpg (13.69 KiB) Viewed 13425 times
homemade1.jpg
homemade1.jpg (18.7 KiB) Viewed 13426 times


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