Discuss our on-site auctions and other slot machine auctions.
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pennymachines
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Re: Canterbury Auction Galleries sale 5-6 Feb

Postby pennymachines » Wed Feb 06, 2019 4:09 pm

The "1940s" Payramid, as JC pointed out is the '60s version of the game, but in fact this one would have been made in the late '80s or '90s by Jim Bryan, who substituted orange leatherette at that time for the traditional green.

716.jpg
Roger Gillman's fantasy love test did well at £680.

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Re: Canterbury Auction Galleries sale 5-6 Feb

Postby frayle » Wed Feb 06, 2019 8:50 pm

If the Payramid was made as recently as the 1980s/'90s then presumably it would have been produced in order to sell directly to a collector, as opposed to a showman, who clearly would have had no interest in it, particularly as it operates using the traditional old penny?
Perhaps this explains the marvellous condition of these machines - the fact that they were made long after their intended 'time', and were bought for nostalgic reasons, and not for use by the masses in a commercial capacity?
Otherwise why make machines designed to use the old penny in the '90s? OR, are they in fact that recent....?

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Re: Canterbury Auction Galleries sale 5-6 Feb

Postby pennymachines » Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:07 pm

frayle wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 8:50 pm
If the Payramid was made as recently as the 1980s/'90s then presumably it would have been produced in order to sell directly to a collector, as opposed to a showman, who clearly would have had no interest in it, particularly as it operates using the traditional old penny?
Yes, that was the market by this time. I bought an old penny Payramid and Three Ball game from Jim myself. Pricewise they were attractive, and in perfect condition of course, but rate of production was inevitably low, as Jim mostly worked single handed by this time. Presumably the game could be accurately dated by its serial number, if he was still applying them.

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Re: Canterbury Auction Galleries sale 5-6 Feb

Postby frayle » Wed Feb 06, 2019 10:04 pm

Interesting. I wonder how many 'modern' machines of the various types Jim Bryan made in those later years?

How much did your Payramid cost back then if you don't mind telling? If you do no worries!

The Canterbury Payramid has a number of 998 - does that tell us anything about quantities made generally?

According to Braithwaite's book a total of 1003 Payramids were made, which seems to dovetail quite neatly with the apparent production date of No.998 - almost too neatly!?

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Re: Canterbury Auction Galleries sale 5-6 Feb

Postby pennymachines » Wed Feb 06, 2019 11:23 pm

Off the top of my head, I'd say it was about £350 - don't know if I still have the receipt...

The precise '1003 Payramids' came from Mr Bryan's order book, recording when and where the machines were sold (a keen collector now has this useful document). Given its condition, it makes sense that only five more were made after this one.

Interesting to see that Roger was selling the Passion Tester for £625 in the '80s - not quite kept up with inflation: https://pennymachines.co.uk/.Arena/SMN-6c.shtml

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Re: Canterbury Auction Galleries sale 5-6 Feb

Postby treefrog » Wed Feb 06, 2019 11:58 pm

I always had assumed and believe read on the site before, Bryan’s numbers started at 101 for number 1 machine !PUZZLED!

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Re: Canterbury Auction Galleries sale 5-6 Feb

Postby JC » Thu Feb 07, 2019 12:04 am

The Canterbury Payramid has a number of 998 - does that tell us anything about quantities made generally?

According to Braithwaite's book a total of 1003 Payramids were made, which seems to dovetail quite neatly with the apparent production date of No.998 - almost too neatly!?
For those who are not aware, all of Bryans serial numbers started at 101, so in this instance, serial number 998 wasn't the fifth to last, there were another 105 after this machine.
As for:
(a keen collector now has this useful document).
It really is a pity that this 'keen' collector doesn't seem to be inclined to share this information :#:

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Re: Canterbury Auction Galleries sale 5-6 Feb

Postby JC » Thu Feb 07, 2019 12:05 am

Sorry froggie, you beat me to it......

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Re: Canterbury Auction Galleries sale 5-6 Feb

Postby JC » Thu Feb 07, 2019 12:22 am

Just looked at the prices in the Arena. Stupid money thrown at some of the machines, but a few sold for pretty fair money, taking commission into consideration. Can't believe the Bryans 3 Ball 9 Cup sold for the same money as that god-awful Parkers Carousel.

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Re: Canterbury Auction Galleries sale 5-6 Feb

Postby frayle » Thu Feb 07, 2019 9:02 am

JC wrote:
Thu Feb 07, 2019 12:04 am
The Canterbury Payramid has a number of 998 - does that tell us anything about quantities made generally?

According to Braithwaite's book a total of 1003 Payramids were made, which seems to dovetail quite neatly with the apparent production date of No.998 - almost too neatly!?
For those who are not aware, all of Bryans serial numbers started at 101, so in this instance, serial number 998 wasn't the fifth to last, there were another 105 after this machine.
As for:
(a keen collector now has this useful document).
It really is a pity that this 'keen' collector doesn't seem to be inclined to share this information :#:

Is it really likely that a further 105 Payramids were made in the late 1980's and 90's - would there have been such a demand from 'collectors', many of whom apparently didn't even realise such machines could be bought at all at this time?

If there were such a number then surely thirty plus years on they would be popping up at auction on a very regular basis?

Can't really see it - until we find Payramids numbered well over the 1000 mark?

Anybody out there have No 1075 or even 1103 ?? Etc etc.


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