Which wood glue would do?

Advice and guidance on repair and restoration techniques.
pennymachines
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Re: Which wood glue would do?

Post by pennymachines »

My woodwork teacher also, "possessed hardly any discipline", but disciplined his class by throwing chisels at us. I don't think they allow it nowadays. Health and safety gone mad. :roll:
bryans fan wrote: Wed Jun 29, 2022 7:27 pm I have always used the evo stik weatherproof (blue) / (green) normal wood adhesive with excellent results.
But that begs two of my questions:
Would you get the same results with a much cheaper brand of PVA?
Is it an excellent result when the gold standard of period restoration/conservation is reversibility? Are we unwittingly making future repair work harder?
The type of glue used on the original joinery is important. Prior to the mid forties, hot animal hide glue was the traditional glue used in furniture assembly. After that time, PVA glues eventually replaced hide glue. Hide glue has some annoying application characteristics but it's redemption is in the fact that it is reversible. It can be "re-activated" with water and heat and it will re-bond to itself. This means that joints originally glued with hide glue do not have to scraped to bare wood to get the new glue to stick. Just re-apply some new glue after moistening the old glue with hot water. You can use either hot hide glue made from dry granules or pre-mixed hide glue like Franklin's. The pre-mixed variety will give you more open time to work than the hot type. You can also use a PVA glue to re-glue an old hide glued joint, but be very cautious with doing this on antiques. PVA glue is not considered reversible and will make any future repairs difficult.
Repairing Furniture Joints - antique restorers
One might wonder, why continue to use hide glue? First, it is a good adhesive, it can hold up for decades to centuries in ideal environmental conditions. Second, for anyone who wishes to maintain the originality of valuable antiques, hide glue is an essential part of that originality. A third reason often given is that it is reversible. It's very weakest feature can be a benefit when taking apart a piece to replace a broken component.
https://furniturerenewal.com/repair/re- ... iture.html
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brigham
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Re: Which wood glue would do?

Post by brigham »

Another good reason to 'continue' to use hide glue is that it is a renewable resource.
I don't know what PVA is made from, but I'll wager it has something to do with petroleum.
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badpenny
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Re: Which wood glue would do?

Post by badpenny »

From t'web

PVA is made up of a water-based emulsion of a widely used type of glue, referred to variously as wood glue, white glue, carpenter's glue, school glue, or PVA glue. PVA is largely used in glass fiber-reinforced plastics to improve the stress and antishrink properties. It is also used in automobile headlights to promote their gloss performance. In addition, PVA may be added to cement/concrete where it can improve the water-resistance properties. Because PVA is a emulsion, not a true water solution, once the film is dry, it is rather hydrophobic.

PVA stands for Polyvinyl Acetate

:-(
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brigham
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Re: Which wood glue would do?

Post by brigham »

Hydrophobic!
It has Rabies?
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badpenny
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Re: Which wood glue would do?

Post by badpenny »

Totally off Topic.
However I learnt this week that rabies only presents symptoms similar to hydrophobia.

The virus needs water to successfully transfer through a bite. So to ensure the host has a mouth awash with saliva the virus stops the host from swallowing. Tales are told of frothing at the mouth.
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